Frequently Asked Questions

Registration Questions

  1. Am I eligible for CSP? How do I apply?
  2. How do I register for CSP?
  3. What do I do if the computer is rejecting my worklist, but I have taken all the required courses?
  4. What if the program is full?
  5. There's no space in the section of CSP that I want. Can I put my name on the waitlist?
  6. I'm a computer science major. Can I enroll in CSP?

Course Questions

  1. I have advanced credit. Can I apply this towards one of the CSP science courses?
  2. What choices do I have for Biology?
  3. The program I plan to enter in 2nd year (or beyond) does not require all the CSP courses. Do I have to take all the CSP courses?
  4. Which recommended Science electives do I need?
  5. In which Term 2 recommended Science electives should I register now?
  6. What if I don't have Physics 12?
  7. What if I don't have Calculus 12?
  8. Am I required to take the Math Basic Skills Test?
  9. Which electives should I take?

General questions about CSP

  1. What is the CSP Workshop?
  2. When and where do the CSP Workshops take place?
  3. What does the CSP timetable look like?
  4. Is CSP harder than the first-year Standard Program?
  5. What is the difference between CSP and the first-year Standard Program?
  6. What is the difference between CSP and Science One?
  7. What role do the CSP Lecturers play?
  8. What if I discover CSP is not for me? Can I transfer out of the program?

Answers

  1. Am I eligible for CSP? How do I apply?
    There is no separate application for CSP. Any student who has been accepted into the Faculty of Science and has taken Chemistry 12 and Physics 12 (or their equivalents) is eligible for the program. Note that these courses may be completed in the summer after registration; see FAQ 12 . Strongly recommended (but not required) are Calculus 12 and proficiency in English. A mark of 75% or better in English 12 or an LPI score of 5 or better meets the requirement for enrollment in first year English and represents a suitable level of proficiency.
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  2. How do I register for CSP?
    Registering for CSP is much like registering for any UBC course using the online registration system. The key difference is that you register from the standard timetable menu, rather than the course menu. Step-by-step registration instructions are available on the prospective students page of this site. Each CSP Standard Timetable (STT) will register you for all required CSP lecture sections, labs, tutorials, and the CSP workshop. In addition, all STT's (except A4, C4, and D4) will register you in Biol 112. STTs A4, C4, and D4 will register you in Biol 111 (see FAQ 8 for more information about Biology). You must register for your elective courses separately.
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  3. What do I do if the computer is rejecting my worklist?
    Check the SSC to be sure that marks for your Grade 12 courses are in the UBC Student Database.  If you are missing a mark for Chemistry 12, Pre-calculus (Math 12) or Physics 12, this may cause your worklist to be rejected.  In that case, try to enter your marks. If this problem occurs after June 12, 2017, contact us for help with registration.
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  4. What if the program is full?
    If all sections of CSP are full, you can register in the CSP waitlist. If you do this, you must also register for standard sections of the appropriate individual science courses. If a space in CSP becomes available, you will be contacted by email to confirm that you still wish to enroll in CSP. Assuming you say yes, we will change your registration, and enroll you in CSP. Therefore, it is important to ensure that you have entered a valid and current email address on the SSC!
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  5. There's no space in the section of CSP that I want. Can I put my name on the waitlist?
    No. The waitlist doesn't get activated until ALL sections of CSP are full.
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  6. I'm a computer science major. Can I enroll in CSP?
    Yes, computer science students are allowed to drop one of the core CSP courses to fit in their computer science courses. We suggest that you register in timetable A1 if you have high school biology or A4 if you do not;  then register for CPSC 110 in Sections 101 and L1J (Term 1) and for CPSC 121 in Sections 203, L2J and T2C (Term 2).  Note that there may be other course combinations that will work with CSP timetables. You should also contact us if you wish to drop Biol 112 (Term 1) or one of the second term subjects, Biol 121 or Chem 123. 
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  7. I have advanced credit. Can I apply this towards the CSP science courses?
    If you have advanced credit in Biology, Chemistry, Math or Physics, you may drop or replace ONE CSP course and remain in CSP. The departments of Chemistry and Physics recommend that you do not use advanced credits for Chemistry or Physics.
    In all cases, you must contact us to alter your STT.  You cannot do this yourself.
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  8. What choices do I have for Biology?
    The CSP STT automatically enrolls each student in Biol 121 in Term 2, and most students will want to enroll individually in Biol 140 (in either Term 1 or Term 2).  Students with no high school biology are required to take Biol 111 during the first term. Most CSP students will want to take Biol 112 (usually in the first term), because it is a requirement for most life science majors. To help students register for Biol 111 and/or 112, we have included these courses in the STTs: Biol 112 in 7 of the 10 STT's (all STT's except A4, C4 and D4); Biol 111 (for students with no high school Biology) in STT's A4, C4 and D4. If you do not want to be enrolled in either Biology course, contact us right after you register, and we will remove it from your timetable.
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  9. The program I plan to enter in 2nd year (or beyond) does not require all the CSP courses. Do I have to take all the CSP courses?
    CSP students may remove only ONE of the core set of CSP lecture courses: Biol 121, Math 102 & 103, Chem 121 & 123, and Phys 101. One of the foundations of the program is that students take all their courses together; therefore, with respect to these courses, the standard timetable (STT) cannot be modified. Most of the CSP STTs  include Biol 112, which is NOT a core CSP lecture course, and which therefore may be dropped (see FAQ 8 ). 
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  10. Which recommended science electives should I take? 
    Many degree programs in the Faculty of Science require additional first-year science courses beyond those in the CSP standard timetables, specifically Biology 140 and Physics 118.  One or both of these courses would normally be taken during first year. Alternatively, it might be possible to take one or both in the summer following first year.  Students who wish to major in one of the life sciences will usually need to take Biology 140. Students who wish to major in one of the physical sciences will usually need to take Physics 118.  Those who wish to major in Physics, Biophysics, Astronomy or Atmospheric Science will need to take Physics 117 in place of Physics 101, and will also need to take Physics 118 and 119.  Students who wish to major in Biophysics will need to take Biology 140.  Students who wish to major in Cellular, Anatomical and Physiological Sciences (i.e. Physiology, also called CAPS) will need to take Biology 140 plus 6 credits of Physics, either Physics 101 and 118, or Physics 100 and 101.  Some Science Majors require neither of these courses; examples are Biotechnology, Computer Science, Geography and Mathematics. For full details of requirements for each Science Major, please check the UBC Academic Calendar[back to top of page]
  11. In which Term 2 recommended Science electives should I register now?
    The three courses covered in this FAQ, Biology 140, Physics 118 and Physics 119, are not a part of any CSP timetable.  But, most CSP students will need to take at least one of them as an elective to have all the first-year requirements for the degree program of their choice.  You should review the details under FAQ #10.  If you are unsure about what you would like to choose, you could register in both Biology 140 and Physics 118. Because these are Term 2 courses, you will not have to pay for them until the beginning of Term 2, which leaves you plenty of time to drop whichever course is unnecessary for the degree program of your choice.
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  12. What if I don't have Physics 12?
    You have two options to be in CSP.  One option is take Physics 12 as a summer school course or as an online course to be completed before the UBC term begins in September. The other option is to substitute Physics 100 for Physics 101 in Term 1. In either case, students who have not completed Physics 12 by June MUST CONTACT the CSP office by email to register in CSP. In your email to CSP for the purpose of registration, provide the following information: your name, student number, whether or not you will be taking Physics 12 during the summer, first, second and third choice of standard timetable, plus your assigned registration day and time. Provided there is space, you will be registered in the CSP program. If you are completing Physics 12 before September, you may choose any timetable.  Please be sure that documentation of completion is provided to us before the UBC term begins in September. If documentation is not received, the student will be de-registered from all CSP classes, and must attempt to register in available science courses at that time.  If you plan to take Physics 100 in place of Physics 101, then we will register you in (one of) timetable D1, D2 or D4. 
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  13. What if I do not have Calculus 12?
    Calculus 12 is a prerequisite for Math 102, which is included in the standard timetable (STT). However, if you have not taken Calculus 12 and are registered in CSP, you will have the option to remain in Math 102 or to substitute Math 180 for Math 102 in your STT. Please contact us if you wish to inquire about this option because you will not be able to make this substitution on your own.
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  14. Am I required to take the Math Basic Skills Test?
    If your mark in Math 12 was less than 80%, you may be required to take the Math Basic Skills Test. Click on this link to see the details. If you are required to take the test, but do not get a high enough mark to enroll in Math 180 or Math 102, you will be dropped from CSP, and will need to register for all your science courses separately.
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  15. Which electives should I take?
    All UBC science students require 6 credits of 100-level English (called the Communication Requirement), and it is recommended that you take these courses as early in your degree program as possible. If you have NEITHER Biology 11 nor 12 (or equivalent), you must take Biology 111 during your first term at UBC (STT's A4, C4, or D4). Students who wish to take either Biol 140 or Phys 118/119 should register individually for these courses.  They are not built in to the CSP Standard Timetable. Other than this, your choice of electives depends on your future academic plans. Check the UBC calendar or contact individual departments for details before choosing your electives. Beyond these requirements, you should choose electives that are of interest to you. Popular choices for past CSP students have included Anthropology, language courses, Philosophy, and Psychology.
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  16. What is the CSP Workshop?
    Each week, CSP students meet in small groups for a two-hour multidisciplinary workshop. These involve participation in a variety of hands-on activities, discussions and debates, group projects, and student-led presentations. The workshops provide the opportunity to develop problem solving, critical thinking, and communication skills useful in all scientific disciplines and future careers. The workshops are NOT tutorial sessions, but are a chance to look more deeply at selected topics relating to course material and explore topics common to all the sciences. The two-term CSP workshop is worth 1 credit, with students receiving a mark on a pass/fail basis.
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  17. Where and when do the workshops take place?
    Workshop times and days vary depending on which CSP section you choose. You can look at the complete Standard Timetable (STT) for each CSP section to find this information. The course number of the workshop is CSPW 100. The workshops are held in room 185 of the I.K. Barber Learning Centre (IBLC) building.
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  18. What does the CSP timetable look like?
    Please refer to the UBC Calendar for the timetable for each CSP section.
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  19. Is CSP harder than the first-year Standard Program?
    CSP students take standard science courses, as do students in the first year standard program, the difference being that the CSP students take all science courses together in special CSP sections.  The CSP program also requires a weekly two-hour commitment to the multidisciplinary workshops. However, CSP also offers the academic and social support needed to meet this challenge, particularly through the community of CSP students. (Historically, the CSP sections of the science courses have often achieved higher marks than other sections). In most courses, CSP students write the same midterm and final exams as students in regular sections.
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  20. What is the difference between CSP and the first-year Standard Program?
    CSP students make up just one of many sections in Physics 101, Math 102/103, Chemistry 121/123, and Biology 121 at UBC. All sections cover the same curriculum, and the final exam in each Chemistry, Physics and Math course is the same for all sections. A key difference between CSP and the Standard Program is the multidisciplinary workshop. Another big difference is the smaller social and learning community of CSP. This provides support that is hard to match in the Standard Program. Other differences between the two programs are described here.
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  21. What is the difference between CSP and Science One?
    Science One is a smaller program whose students are selected on the basis of an application. They take all their classes in one room, whereas CSP classes are held in each department. CSP students get a separate grade for each course, while Science One students get a single grade for the whole integrated package. Science One is academically and personally more intense than CSP. Other differences are described here.
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  22. What role do the CSP Lecturers play?
    The CSP Lecturers are here to help you. Their specific responsibilities include running the multidisciplinary workshops and helping students gain a greater understanding of course material. You should also feel free to ask them for help or advice regarding UBC bureaucracy, your career goals, academic programs, etc. While they may not be able to answer all your questions, they can usually find someone who can.
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  23. What if I discover CSP is not for me? Can I transfer out of the program?
    We encourage you to communicate with us if you are thinking about withdrawing from CSP. If, after discussion and mutual agreement, withdrawal is the best course of action, we will make every effort to transfer you into the standard program. Note that you will receive a W (withdrawl) for the CSP workshop - you must participate for the full duration of the academic year to receive a P (pass).
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